Mosquito Bites: Why They Itch And How To Stop Them

Mosquito Bites: Why They Itch And How To Stop Them

Few things are more irritating than a mosquito bite. The red bumps on your ankles, elbows and toes. Then there’s the non-stop itching.

And yet, they are a sign of summer. As the warm weather begins to roll in, so do they. Unlike other more pleasant parts of summer, how can you keep this part of it at bay?

The first thing is to know the science behind the scratching. Female mosquitoes are the culprits, needing your blood to make their eggs. They get this by sticking their needle-like mouthparts (proboscis) into your skin and releasing saliva-filled anti-coagulant to stop your blood from clotting. It’s this saliva that has you scratching, as your body reacts to a foreign substance. To make things worse, nerves around the bite react to make your skin itch even more. All of this culminates in the familiar red bump on your skin.

These bumps can hang around from anywhere between 30 minutes to 24 hours. The important thing is not to scratch. By giving in, you make your body react even more to the bite, and the itch gets worse.

Thankfully, there are alternatives. Medical solutions include calamine lotion, hydrocortisone cream and even oral antihistamines. A smear of Vicks is also said to do wonders. But if you don’t feel like spending a lot, or need a more immediate solution, then look no further than your bathroom and kitchen. Honey, apple cider vinegar and a paste of baking soda can help soothe. Cleaning alcohol disinfects and cools the area, while toothpaste’s anti-inflammatory properties can do the trick. Even deodorant helps, by absorbing mosquito saliva.

But prevention, as the saying goes, is better than a cure. Swatting them away won’t do much to thin their numbers.

Peaceful Sleep is your answer of course. Whether staying in or staying active, there’s a whole range of products available. Peaceful Sleep creates an effective 8-hour barrier from mosquitoes, so you can enjoy the parts of summer you should be enjoying.